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Saturday, March 16, 2013

A Finished Project!

A few days ago, I was scanning Facebook for interesting woodworking posts when I happened to spot one from one our own Master’s students. Now, it’s always a pleasure to see the finished projects that result from all the hard work our alumni put in during any given class, but it’s even more of a pleasure when we get to see the results they attain as they integrate all the different classes they’ve taken along the path to their Master’s award. Anyway, I liked his finished piece so much, I couldn’t resist asking (or was that badgering) John to write a little more about it, so that I could share his accomplishment with all of you!

-markwithak

 

Hi, my name is John D’Amico and I have been attending MASW since 2006. This latest piece came to fruition during Michael Fortunes, “Developing an Idea” class last year. This was a great class for me personally, as it opened up a whole new world of design other than the rectilinear designs that I had been stuck on.

John’s Styrofoam Model
We began the class by making models using foam board, an Exacto knife, and (of course) a hot melt glue gun. One of our assignments was to take a stroll out to the pond at the rear of the school to seek out new design ideas, and then sketch something that we might incorporate into our models. I developed my inspiration from some blades of grass and the trees near the pond. I took the sketch back to class, made a couple of models, and really liked one in particular. After I took this idea back home and made a wooden model of it, I decided that this would be my project for my Masters/Apprenticeship class with Michael Fortune.

 

 

A view of completed project Closeup of projectAnother view of project

 

As you will see from the photos, the piece has evolved as I worked on it. The finished piece uses cherry for the stems and curly maple for the tops with ebony inlay details at each end. The base is made of concrete with two coats of primer and two finish coats of bronze paint applied. The concrete was placed in a form made of wiggle wood and sculptured with a mason’s tool. While the bronze paint is semi-dry a spray is applied that gives it its patina. The help and inspiration I received from Michael, Marc Adams,  Zane, Doug and Mark H. during the class was and still is greatly appreciated.

1 Comments

Comments

Just updated with a new picture!

Posted by: markwithak on March 17, 2013 at 10:43:37 am

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